Cognitive Science MSc

Title

Cognitive Science MSc

Degree

Cognitive Scientist

Type

Degree program

Level

Master

Language

English

Duration

4 semesters (2 years)

ECTS credits

120

Minimum number of students

5

Maximum number of students

30

Short description

Cognitive Science is an interdisciplinary Masters Program involving different scientific fields of natural sciences, technological sciences, and humanities as well. The focus of investigations is on the phenomena of cognition - perception, attention, memory, reasoning, thinking, and behavior - from an interdisciplinary perspective: Anthropology, Artificial Intelligence, Biology, Linguistics, Neuroscience, Philosophy, and Psychology have contributed to its development as core disciplines. The program offers a timely approach to answer the deep philosophical question of what is human cognition – ‘Who we are, and what kind of capabilities make us human’, with the help of modern scientific methods, like model building and sophisticated monitoring techniques (eye-tracking, EEG). The relevance of such an approach gains support from the constant need of building a knowledge-based society.

Strength of program

Our university has longstanding educational and research traditions in a wide area of fields, including both humanities and science, thus providing an appropriate background for a multidisciplinary field such as cognitive science. The skills and knowledge gained during the programme can be applied in a very wide area of basic research, applied research, and jobs outside the academic field. The students will have the opportunity to work with distinguished researchers on various projects in the university laboratories or join research in our partner institutions. They will have the opportunity to participate in international collaborations on research projects, and the chance to do international training with one of our partner universities.

More information: http://www.eng.ppk.elte.hu/degree-programmes/cognitive-science-msc/

Basic Subjects

Introduction to Cognitive Science

Historical and conceptual introduction to cognitive science from a combined philosophical, psychological, biological and computational point of view. We start with the prehistory of the cognitive paradigm and discuss how cognitivism endeavours to solve its problems. We characterize classic cogsci from the point of view of language, formal systems, and computations and discuss its basic philosophical underpinnings as well as the arising problems. Then we turn to connectionism and the soft computing, brain theory inspired metaphors of the mind, to conclude with the modern picture (and its criticism) in embodiment, the “dynamic hypothesis” as well as the new philosophy of mind.

I. The Nature of Cognitive Science

    ...

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Mathematics

Aim of the course:

The goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of those branches and fundamental concepts of mathematics that are needed most frequently in cognitive scienceIn addition to well-applicable mathematical ideas I also plan to include some fun ideas and proofs that connect to those with practical importance.

Learning outcome, competences knowledge:

  • knows the introductory theories of mathematics

attitude:

  • Interest for theoretical issues

skills:

Statistics and Methodology

The course starts with an introduction of basic concepts of statistics (distributions and estimation of distribution parameters; hypothesis testing, types of errors, significance, power, and effect size), and continues with methods of univariate statistics (correlation and regression; comparing two or more means; between-subject and within-subject designs; non-parametric methods). Depending on the audience, we can also address more complex methods such as multiple regression, analysis of covariance, MANOVA, and exploratory factor analysis. For carrying out statistical tests we use SPSS and R-Studio.

Learning outcome, competences knowledge:

  • use SPSS and R-Studio
...

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Neurobiology

The course aims to overview the fundamental structural and dynamic principles of neurobiology. First, it decomposes the nervous system into the basic cellular constituents and mechanisms, and then redintegrates them into a large network model of the macroscopic brain. The course will step-by-step introduce neurons, circuitries, systems and macroscopic functional networks. It will review the functional segregation of cortical areas and their association with subcortical structures from systems neuroscience and neuroanatomical point of views. Individual lectures will be devoted to the major neural systems and cortical areas and their relationship to sensory, perceptual, memory, language, motor and executive functions. Finally, the course will cover the basic brain

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Epistemology

The course offers an introduction to the epistemological tradition in Western philosophy. In addition to some historical investigations introducing central epistemological problems and some of the most essential approaches, the main focus of the course is on more recent advances in 20th century philosophy, with special emphasis on theories of scientific cognition as the paragon of knowledge acquisition.

The course includes a series of lectures and a reading seminar.

The main topics of the course are the followings:

1. Epistemological problems in the history of philosophy

Logic and Logical Semantics

The course offers an introduction to symbolic logic and its semantics. The main topics are:

  • Propositional logic: Symbolic language and syntactical notions; Propositional calculus and derivability; Truth values and bivalence; Truth tables; Interpretation, Model and Inference
  • First order logic: Predicate logic; Quantification and variables; Quantificational calculus;  Interpretation and the Universe of discourse; First order models
  • Metalogical properties: Semantic soundness and completeness; First order theories; Gödel’s incompleteness theorems, Church’s theorem and Tarski’s results on truth function
  • Read more »


Informatics

Introduction to cognitive informatics

  1. What is computational cognitive modelling, types of cognitive modelling, what is computational cognitive modelling good for, multiple levels of cognitive modelling, successes and pitfalls of cognitive modelling
  2. Introduction to symbolic modelling
  3. Introduction to connectionist type modelling
  4. Connectionist vs Symbolic vs Hybrid Modelling

Connectionist Modelling

  1. What is an artificial neuron and how it transmits information – Activation functions, connection weights,

    ...

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Core Curriculum

Cognitive Psychology 1.

On the basis of the classical and modern theories this course gives master level knowledge in cognitive psychology. The main goals of the course are (1) to train basic skills that are necessary to use the concepts of cognitive psychology, (2) to introduce determinant theories, (3) to review the basic methods used in the empirical analyses of cognitive functions. The structure of the course consists of two parts: a general empirical foundation and an intensive discussion about the elements of the cognitive architecture. The overall theory systems and the unique theories of the cognitive fields are discussed equally. The form of the course enhances competence of the students, which will enable them to learn the research results supporting and/or contradicting the

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Philosophy of Science
  1. Scientific inquiry: invention and test (Introductory examples for hypotheses, explanations, tests etc.)
  2. The test of a hypothesis (Experimental and crucial tests. Auxiliary and ad hoc hypotheses.)
  3. Observation and theory (The Baconian model of science. Novum Organum. Inductive reasoning. Nature and experiment. Observation and experiment. The decuctive-nomological model of explanation. Underdetermination of theories by facts.  Observer influence in the various sciences.)
  4. Positivism (The British Empiricists. Comte and origins of positivism. Mach and empiriocriticism. The Vienna Circle. The fall of positivism: protocol sentences, justification,

    ...

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Computer Programming

Aim of the course:

Students will be able to write and modify simple scripts, to run experiments, analize data and simulate models.

Content of the course
Topics of the course

  • Bases of computer programming
  • Python and Matlab
  • Experimenting software use: OpenSesame and PsychoPy
  • Data analysis with Python: numpy, pandas, scipy, statsmodels, matplotlib
  • Simple simulations with Python

Learning outcome, competences...

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Intelligent Systems

This is an introductory course to computational neuroscience. The main question is how to use mathematics in order to describe the structure, dynamics and function of the neural system. We will learn examples of neural implementation of cognitive functions. A science major is a great advantage for this course but it will provide interesting insight to our up to date understanding of the brain potentially for anyone.

Some chapters of Peter Dayan and LF Abbott: Theoretical Neuroscience (Computational and Mathematical Modeling of Neural Systems) are useful.

Background info: The Encyclopeida of Computational Neuroscience is under development: http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Encyclopedia_of_Computational_Neuroscience

...

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Evolutionary Psychology
  1. Introduction: The history of studies on animal thinking. From anecdotal cognitivism to modern cognitive ethology.
  2. Methods of behaviour observation
  3. Traditional comparative psychology and ethology as different approaches. Data collection in nature, modern lab. studies, ways of studying human cognition.l
  4. Understanding physical world: skills and evolutionary compulsions. Object representation abilities, numerical abilities.
  5. Skills of understanding social worlds. The Machiavellian intelligence. Primate studies and observations on human infants: the emergence of human cognition. 
  6. Read more »


Neuropsychology

The course overviews the fundamental concepts, models and methods of neuropsychology. The course starts with introducing a general neuropsychological framework for acquired deficits, grand syndromes and their relation to cognitive architecture. As it further develops, it examines the neural bases of higher order mental functions, including research from human experimental and human clinical perspectives, while focusing on the balance in presenting knowledge both about the brain and about cognition.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

  • appropriate knowledge in the main fields of neuropsychology
  • neuropsychlogical assessment

    ...

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Philosophy of Mind

The course addresses fundamental issues in the philosophy of mind such as the mind-body problem, consciousness, qualia, introspection, self-understaning/self-ignorance, and intentionality. Classic articles  (e.g., by Thomas Nagel, David Rosenthal, and David Armstrong) and texts representing the research of the past decade (e.g., by Van Gulick and E. Schwitgabel) are equally used, for a balanced picture. Topics overlapping with the philosophy of cognitive science (e.g., extended mind, modularity) are also part of the course material. Overviews of the range of positions on each topic are provided by the instructor.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

Psycholinguistics

The aim of the curse is to give an introduction to cognitive psychological models of language processing and production, within a broader framework of intentional human communication. The course is necessarily interdisciplinary, as several concepts, models, and evidence from philosophy of language, linguistics, neurolinguistics, neuropsychology, neurosciences and computational modelling will be touched upon, although the major focus will be on psychological models and methodology. Here again specific emphasis will be put on acquired and developmental impairments of intentional communication and language.

The main topics to be discussed are the followings: General theoretical approaches to the psychology of language, Sentence

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Semantics and Knowledge Representation

The topic of knowledge representation has strong connection with most fields of cognitive science, e.g. vision, sensory-motor integration, language, memory, reasoning, and imagery processes. The aim of this course is to present a new theoretical viewpoint on categorization and conceptual representation (the so called ‘concept empiricism’ approach of J. Prinz and a similar view of L.W. Barsalou). From this starting point we can discuss all important questions of knowledge representation with special focus on empirical questions, cognitive development, and the connection to other cognitive processes.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

Specialization in Cognitive Models of Science

Theory of Science

The course will focus on some fundamental problems of cognition and communication. Its main methodological tool will be a philosophical analysis of the following concepts: representations, sign, information, knowing and knowledge, virtuality, openness, reality and virtual reality, communication, community, culture, individual vs. social cognition.

Certain elements of cognitive science, information theory, communication theory, theory of culture will be referred and analyzed.

In the representation of the subject matter of knowledge two essentially different strategies can be identified: the free and the bound (bound, non-free, connected, etc.) strategies. As an illustration the physiological

...

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Cognitive Movement in the Philosophy of Science

This course is an introduction to the core concepts and disciplines of cognitive science. We shall cover important topics in philosophy of mind, language and cognition, cognition and evolution, notions of cognitive architecture and some areas of neuroscience. Our goal is to provide a conceptual foundation around which studies of different disciplines can be organized, and a sense of unity of cognitive science’s world view.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

  • broad theoretical knowledge in the field

attitude:

  • comprehensive theoretical interest

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Historical Reconstruction of Scientific Thinking

The course will provide an overview of the history of Western sciences from its Ancient beginning until the emergence of cognitive sciences in the middle of 20th century. The lectures will focus on the history of scientific thinking instead of the concrete historical events or advancements in scientific disciplines. The history of scientific thinking – following a kind of Lakatosian methodology – will be presented as a historical reconstruction of scientific thinking. (As Lakatos mentioned, the “real history” of science can be identified as footnotes on the “reconstructed” historical process.) The meaning of this reconstruction is clear enough: to present the historical process which eventuated in the formation of cognitive science.

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Project Work

The aim of the course is to offer students the possibility to do intensive, tutored research in order to write a high quality MA thesis, based on well-designed and correctly executed empirical research. The actual topic and schedule of this practical course therefore is highly individualised according to the actual research focus and methodology.

Learning outcome, competences knowledge:

  • learning how to do intensive, tutored research
  • complex nature of the higher order cognitive mechanisms

attitude:

  • sensitivity to the methodological questions
...

Read more »


Cognitive Anthropology

„Cognitive anthropology is the study of the relation between human society and human thought.”  -Roy D’Andrade, The Development of Cognitive Anthropology

The aim of this course is to present some of the main themes of contemporary cognitive anthropology and the various ways how to use an interdisciplinary approach of cognitive science and anthropology.
Main focuses are:

  • introduction of research strategies of contemporary cognitive anthropology;
  • introducing research perspectives which are promising in sheding light on muliple relations between human cognition and cultural phenomena.

Topics:

Sociology of Knowledge

The course aims to introduce the main concepts of sociology of knowledge for students of cognitive science and to discuss a set of relevant research. The class will start with an overview of certain ideas of classical authors of the field: Durkheim and Mauss’s ideas on social origins of classification; Mannheim’s views on the connections between class position and worldview;  Schütz’s phenomenological sociology; Beger and Luckmann’s conception on the social construction of reality; Garfinkel’s demonstration of the morality of everyday cognition. Then the discussion turns to the topics of social constructionist accounts of various cognitive phenomena. While more mainstream cognitive psychology can be considered as patterned according to a set of “individualist”

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Scientific Model Building

Objectives

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the field of scientific modelling, model synthesis and analysis. As such, less emphasis will be on a "top-down" approach than in standard lecture courses. Students will have an opportunity to decide which topics will shape the direction of the course.

Contents

Topics to be covered:

  • History of Complex Systems (Turing, von Neumann, Ulam, Conway, Wolfram)
  • Introduction to Cellular Automata (1D/2D CA, rule codes,phenomenological studies, behaviour classes)
  • CA Models of

    ...

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Observation and Experiment

The main objective of this course is to give an overview on the basics of research methodologies (main points listed below), concentrating on the heterogeneity of disciplines covered by Cognitive Science. 

Research Methodologies

  • Descriptive methods
  • Naturalistic observation
  • Survey methods
  • Case studies
  • Archival research
  • Experimental methods
  • Constants

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Psychology of Science

Main Topics of the course

Scientific Thinking and its Mental Infrastructure

In the Western (academic) world scientific thinking is generally viewed as the most powerful means to tackle different problems and to find the most effective solutions for them. The ability to create good theories in order to describe and explain the phenomena is acknowledged as central to scientific thinking. Accordingly, a kind of objectivity and pure rationalism are attributed to it. But scientific thinking is neither a pure cognitive process nor does it take place in an empty space. In this chapter it is argued that scientific thinking just like any other normal every day type of thinking is to be

...

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Cognitive Neuroscience

The two main goals of the course are the demonstration of the methods of cognitive neuroscience, and the presentation of classical and current findings of cognitive and developmental neuroscience. The presentation of physical, biochemical and morphological bases, and historical accounts has the aim that students understand the choice of particular methods, and be able to assess the advantages and disadvantages of them. The presentation of methods is followed by an intensive review of the main findings of cognitive neuroscience both in the fields of cognition (perception, memory, consciousness, language, etc.) and emotion (face perception, prosody, etc.).

The unfolding of the interrelations of brain-cognition-behavior triad

...

Read more »


Human Ethology

Aim of the course:

Human ethology is an integral part of ethology, which is the biological study of animal behaviour. In this lecture the basic concepts of ethology are discussed in relation to human ethology. We also present an overview on the development of this field and explain how the interaction between ethology and psychology generated a novel discipline of studying human behaviour. We present an integrative approach to behaviour by discussing the importance of studying function, mechanism, development and evolution of behaviour in parallel.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

Specialization in Cognitive Neuroscience

Cognitive Neuropsychology

The aim of this course is to present the methods of cognitive neuropsychology and developmental neuropsychology. The developmental neuropsychology part covers the research methodology of the classical and modern adult neuropsychology. The practical is similar to the lecture in its methods, but different in its approach. The exploration of developmental and acquired childhood disorders and patterns are not achievable without the integrated knowledge of the cognitive architecture and the development of the brain. The course gives a methodical basis and trains skills that are necessary in methodology.Main topics: Test and test-systems, The atypical development of perception, Childhood disorders of memory,Language disorders, Disorders of reading and writing, Developmental

...

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Cognitive Informatics in Human Vision

The course will cover cognitive and computational aspects of human vision that extends beyond biological vision. It will start with a historical overview of major technological inventions that influenced our understanding of human vision. Each lecture will frame the topic according David Marr’s levels of explanations. Then, through a variety of examples the course will step-by-step introduce information theory from Shannon information to the formalism of mutual information and finally the Bayesian model. In the course we will overview the major pathways of visual information processing, discuss the differences between bottom-up, top-down and reverse hierarchy models. Special focus will be given to different perceptual biases, signal detection, choice-probability,

...

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Cognitive Developmental Research

This course aims at overviewing the most important methods of developmental research, namely, the special role of observation in developmental psychology. Methodology of observation: design; selection of categories; quantitative attributes of observational variables; methods of recording; instruments; reliability; evaluation.Experiments in developmental research. The natural and the quasi experiments. Cross-sectional and longitudinal strategy, and the possibilities of their combination. Data analysis. Interpretation of results - mediator and moderator effect.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

  • Knowledge on the most important models of development
  • ...

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Knowledge and Culture

The aim of the course is to provide an insight into the problem of knowledge representation. Our goal is to connect viewpoints of cognitive with that of the cultural. We start with the problem of knowledge acquisition, discussing the development of early concepts, the impact of language and subsequently the role of experience (expertise) in forming mental knowledge representations. With the presentation of dynamic conceptual representation models, with the help of discussing scheme and script concepts we connect the cultural and personal nature of knowledge.

knowledge:

  • understanding the interaction between knowledge representation systems and the other cognitive mechanisms
...

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Visual Neuroscience

The course focuses on the neural mechanisms of visual information processing from the sensory to perceptual aspects to it. It starts with the anatomical foundation of the visual and oculomotor system. It will cover the main cellular pathways from the retina through the thalamus and visual cortex to the higher visual cortical areas, including their associations with different of attributes of the visual scene. Transformation between these stages and the receptive field organization at the retinal, LGN and cortical levels will be discussed. The cortical circuitry of visual cortex will be discussed in anatomical and cellular neurophysiological details. The primary segregation and recombination of color, shape, motion and disparity channels will be introduced. The

...

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Language, Cognition, Consciousness and their Development

The aim of the course is to give a detailed overview of the relationship between language and cognition within an interdisciplinary framework, but with a strong emphasis on the relevant findings from empirical psychology. A special focus will be set on conceptual cognition and its relationships – both developmental and functional – to linguistic abilities. So, among the topics to be discussed, there will be a balance between phenomena and models of development and mature functions.

In line with the interdisciplinary framework, the philosophical history of the issue will be briefly discussed, including the fundamental questions and approaches elaborated within the philosophical tradition, but the main focus of the course will

...

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Numerical Cognition

The course reviews the current models of numerical cognition. We cover development of numerical cognition, together with the developmental impairment of those abilities. Relevant aspects of animal cognition is also discussed.

Content of the course
Topics of the course

  • development of numerical cognition,
  • developmental impairment of those abilities.
  • relevant aspects of animal cognition is also discussed.

Learning activities, learning methods
Lectures and interactive discussions

Evaluation of outcomes...

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Psychophysiology of Cognitive Processes

The goal of the course is to provide basic knowledge on the (primarily physiological) mechanisms underlying cognitive psychological processes such as learning, memory, attention, sleep, motivation and psychopharmacology. Both elementary aspects and integrative views are covered including the most important methodological (electrophysiology, biochemistry, neuroimaging, etc.) issues. The rationale behind this approach is that the horizon of the interpretation of the findings of basic and applied psychology becomes much wider and their link to principles of natural sciences easier to understand.

Learning activities, learning methods
Lectures and interactive discussions

mode of evaluation:

...

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Brain Imaging

In vivo functional imaging of the brain has dramatically enhanced researchers’ ability to examine the neural correlates of cognition and behavior. In particular functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (or fMRI) is a particularly attractive technique. fMRI relies on the physical and magnetic properties of brain tissue (in particular blood) which change under conditions of neural activity. This Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast is endogenous to the brain and unlike Positron Emission Tomography does not demand the injection of radioactive contrast agents. fMRI (based on BOLD) is therefore a perfectly safe technique for studying brain function, can and is easily applied to the study of diverse populations (including children), and has reasonable spatial

...

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Cognitive Neuroscience

The two main goals of the course are the demonstration of the methods of cognitive neuroscience, and the presentation of classical and current findings of cognitive and developmental neuroscience. The presentation of physical, biochemical and morphological bases, and historical accounts has the aim that students understand the choice of particular methods, and be able to assess the advantages and disadvantages of them. The presentation of methods is followed by an intensive review of the main findings of cognitive neuroscience both in the fields of cognition (perception, memory, consciousness, language, etc.) and emotion (face perception, prosody, etc.).

The unfolding of the interrelations of brain-cognition-behavior triad

...

Read more »


Human Ethology

Aim of the course:

Human ethology is an integral part of ethology, which is the biological study of animal behaviour. In this lecture the basic concepts of ethology are discussed in relation to human ethology. We also present an overview on the development of this field and explain how the interaction between ethology and psychology generated a novel discipline of studying human behaviour. We present an integrative approach to behaviour by discussing the importance of studying function, mechanism, development and evolution of behaviour in parallel.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

Project Work

The aim of the course is to offer students the possibility to do intensive, tutored research in order to write a high quality MA thesis, based on well-designed and correctly executed empirical research. The actual topic and schedule of this practical course therefore is highly individualised according to the actual research focus and methodology.

Learning outcome, competences knowledge:

  • learning how to do intensive, tutored research
  • complex nature of the higher order cognitive mechanisms

attitude:

  • sensitivity to the methodological questions
...

Read more »


Thesis

Thesis

The overall aim of the course is to provide research experience for students in one of several specific domains in cognitive science. The principle task of it is thus to involve interested students to almost all important phases of ongoing research activities, and invite them into cooperative teamwork.

Learning outcome, competences
knowledge:

  • get real research experience
  • acknowledge and try of the relevant phases of a research

attitude:

  • acquisition of the approach of an active researcher

skills:

Free Electives

Career opportunities

The program provides graduates with the necessary theoretical/intellectual and empirical tools to pursue an academic career (Ph.D. program) in cognitive science or in one of the disciplines related to it. Apart from basic research graduates in cognitive science increasingly find work in applied research: prospective career fields include the IT-sector (interaction design, usability, knowledge management, etc.), education, and biomedical and clinical research, as well as economy. The generic skills (such as teamwork, ability to communicate, reflection and evaluation skills, ability to quickly learn and adapt) acquired by graduates are of use in a variety of careers in the private sector. Graduates of cognitive science are especially suited to work in highly interdisciplinary area, bringing experience in mediating between disciplines. These include the fields of IT and education (see above), as well as the areas of consulting, human resources, and science writing.

EU/EEA students
non-EU/EEA students
Tuition fee/semester

EUR ~1,300 (HUF 400,000)

EUR ~1,300 (HUF 400,000)

Application fee

Please refer to the current regulations at www.felvi.hu

Please refer to the current regulations at www.felvi.hu

Other costs

EUR ~13 EUR (HUF 4,000)

EUR ~13 EUR (HUF 4,000)

non-EU/EEA students
Tuition fee/semester

EUR ~1,300 (HUF 400,000)

Application fee

Please refer to the current regulations at www.felvi.hu

Other costs

EUR ~13 EUR (HUF 4,000)


Offered for the next academic year

Yes

Start program

06, Sep, 2017

Deadline for applications - September intake

20, Aug, 2017

Is there a February intake

No


Admission requirements

A good command of English.

Documents to submit with application

Bachelor-level degree Transcript of records CV Motivation letter Entrance exam fee Other: Reference work Official English translation of the Bachelor-level diploma, if the language of the original is not Hungarian or English Official English translation of the transcript of records if the language of the original is not Hungarian or English A certificate of disadvantaged status (if applicable) A certificate of disability status (if applicable) A certificate of child care allowance (GYES) (if applicable) A language exam certificate other than English (at least level C1) (if applicable) A certificate of placing in the top three at the Hungarian OTDK, the “Lajos Kardos” competition, or other science competition (if applicable) Copy of the main pages of the passport (needs to be valid) (only in case of an entrance exam via Skype)

Further comments (if needed)

Please note that if you obtained your Bachelor’s degree outside Hungary, then an evaluation of your previous studies (a credit evaluation) is mandatory! The degrees listed below will give you an idea of what is required. Unconditionally accepted Bachelor’s degrees: Psychology, Computer Engineering, Software Engineering, Biology, Liberal Arts: Philosophy Specialisation Conditionally accepted Bachelor’s degrees and credit requirements to compensate missing background: Liberal arts: Communications and Media Studies, Business Information Technology, Applied Economics, Economic Analysis, Hungarian Linguistics and Literature: Language Technology specialisation and Theoretical Linguistics specialisation, Pedagogy, Biochemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Architecture, Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineer, Mechatronics Engineering, Electrical Engineer, Economist in Business Administration and Management, Technical Manager, Mathematics.

Application procedure

The application for the MSc in Cognitive Science must be submitted through the FELVI website (http://www.felvi.hu/). The reference work can be any work which the applicant has written within the field of his/her earlier studies (research paper, seminar paper, research report, published article, study etc). The applicant can also write a new paper for the current application, which can be an improved version of an earlier work. If the work has been published or has been presented during the applicant’s studies, please indicate on the paper where it was published or within what context it was written and presented. The maximum length is 15 pages (without the appendices, and there are no requirements for form). If the work was co-authored, the applicant must indicate his/her participation in the paper in percent (%). The reference work must be in English. The oral examination is an interview with the applicant about his/her professional background, scientific interests, and professional plans. The oral examination happens in person, although there is also a Skype interview option.

Program leader

Dr. Ildikó KIRÁLY

Program coordinator

International Admission Coordinator
E-mail:  admission@ppk.elte.hu
TEL: +36-1-461-4500/3499 (ext.)
Postal address: 1075 Budapest Kazinczy utca 23-27

More information
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Faculty of Education and Psychology

Faculty of Education and Psychology

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